The Hoka OneOne Bondi – what makes this running shoe so different?

For Australian runners, the Bondi B/ Bondi Low/ Bondi Speed/ Bondi 2/ Bondi 3 in all its incarnations has been the shoe that grabbed so much attention when Hoka first came to Australia back in 2011, the shoe that most users of Hoka OneOne running gear will have at least one pair of, and that probably offers the clearest first experience to new wearers of what Hoka OneOne means.

See the grey ones in the middle – that was my first pair of Bondi Bs! It kind of gets me emotional, and then I just feel grateful for the new colour schemes 🙂 Click on the picture for my first ever writeup of the Bondi B as well.

The Hoka OneOne Bondi puts 24.5mm of superlight cushioning under the forefoot, 29mm under the heel, and in the latest model – the Bondi 3 – it weighs in at 315g in a US8.5 men’s model and 267g in a US6.5W women’s model. You couldn’t possibly fit that much marshmallow under someone’s foot without tripling the weight of the shoe, but running on marshmallows is one of the most typical ways we hear new Hoka runners describe the feeling of the Bondi. Running on clouds, running on a trampoline, running on pillows – these are also common ways for runners to describe their first experience of the Bondi.

Fast forward 3 years, and the Bondi is a very advanced new animal with the same classic midsole and a number of champion endurance athletes singing its praises. #toldyouso

When you strap the Bondi to tired legs, or when you’re deep into a half-marathon or full marathon with less fatigue than you might be used to, suddenly the shoes weigh next to nothing and those clouds you’re running on feel like they’re racing toward the horizon. That, of course, is subjective. Read more of this post

Hoka OneOne – the evolution continues

Hoka OneOne in 2013 is very much the same as Hoka OneOne in 2010 – an innovative and super comfortable running shoe.

But, clearly, a couple of things have changed. No longer is Hoka OneOne a brand with one, big, bright yellow Hulk foot of a shoe that is visible from outer space. In fact, the latest shoes from Hoka – the Rapa Nui and the Kailua – look almost normal. But they’re not – not entirely.

One of the most common questions we get at running and triathlon expos that we go to and demo runs that we put on from time to time is, ‘what’s the difference between the models?’. It’s not the most exciting sounding question, it’s definitely not as intriguing as, ‘what makes these different?’ (I mean, have you seen our shoes?) but it is a great question to answer. Answering the simple question, ‘what’s the difference between the models?’ is probably the easiest way to explain the evolution of Hoka OneOne, and therefore to understand just where the new Rapa Nui and Kailua fit in.

Current models, a comparison

Current models, a comparison

So here, briefly, is the evolution of the Hoka range. Read more of this post

New models & new colours – Hoka OneOne hitting Australia hard this week.

There are a boatload of upgrades and new models hitting this week. Capital city shoe specialists should have these starting to appear on shelves by Wednesday afternoon. Psyched!  🙂

First off the boat, the new Bondi. We think it looks pretty hot. You’re welcome to agree.

New for Australian runners, the Spring/Summer 2013 edition of the Bondi 2, breathable with a tougher upper, more padding behind the Achilles, and the same super-comfortable underfoot feel that defines every shoe from Hoka OneOne.

New for Australian runners, the Spring/Summer 2013 edition of the Bondi 2, breathable with a tougher upper, more padding behind the Achilles, and the same super-comfortable underfoot feel that defines every shoe from Hoka OneOne. Great for road, dry trail, and days when your legs or feet just feel like they need some extra loving.

There is a new Grey/White/Fushia women’s Bondi arriving next month, but this week we have the new women’s Bondi Speed 2 in sizes USW6-11. That’s right, women’s Hoka now Read more of this post

Karl Meltzer talks about being a 100-mile Machine.

Fresh Video of Karl Meltzer, after his 100-mile winning negative split.

There’s a good reason why this guy is in the picture at the top of our blog page: He kicks ass!

Pinched from the always-excellent pages of Bryon Powell’s iRunFar.

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