The Hoka OneOne Bondi – what makes this running shoe so different?

For Australian runners, the Bondi B/ Bondi Low/ Bondi Speed/ Bondi 2/ Bondi 3 in all its incarnations has been the shoe that grabbed so much attention when Hoka first came to Australia back in 2011, the shoe that most users of Hoka OneOne running gear will have at least one pair of, and that probably offers the clearest first experience to new wearers of what Hoka OneOne means.

See the grey ones in the middle – that was my first pair of Bondi Bs! It kind of gets me emotional, and then I just feel grateful for the new colour schemes 🙂 Click on the picture for my first ever writeup of the Bondi B as well.

The Hoka OneOne Bondi puts 24.5mm of superlight cushioning under the forefoot, 29mm under the heel, and in the latest model – the Bondi 3 – it weighs in at 315g in a US8.5 men’s model and 267g in a US6.5W women’s model. You couldn’t possibly fit that much marshmallow under someone’s foot without tripling the weight of the shoe, but running on marshmallows is one of the most typical ways we hear new Hoka runners describe the feeling of the Bondi. Running on clouds, running on a trampoline, running on pillows – these are also common ways for runners to describe their first experience of the Bondi.

Fast forward 3 years, and the Bondi is a very advanced new animal with the same classic midsole and a number of champion endurance athletes singing its praises. #toldyouso

When you strap the Bondi to tired legs, or when you’re deep into a half-marathon or full marathon with less fatigue than you might be used to, suddenly the shoes weigh next to nothing and those clouds you’re running on feel like they’re racing toward the horizon. That, of course, is subjective. Read more of this post

Hoka’s Julien Chorier podiums The North Face TransGranCanaria

Hoka OneOne’s recent 100-mile athlete addition is the European supremo, Julien Chorier. He has also recently picked up sponsorship from Compressport (copying Scott Hawker there maybe – nice one Scotty!). In the lead-up to the weekend’s epic ultra and 2nd event in the Ultra-Trail World Tour series for the year, Julien and a couple of his European Hoka teammates ran around the island demonstrating some of the upcoming new Hoka kit for 2014. Careful, some of these photos may get you over-excited, especially if you already have more than 4 pairs of Hoka OneOne in your current running rotation.

Endurance running champion Julien Chorier, in his high performance mystery Hoka OneOne, set for release July 2014

But of course, more important than the pre-event running around with photographers and trail journos was the team’s running across the island – 125km and 8,500+m elev. gain – for TransGranCanaria itself. Meghan M Hicks from iRunFar.com reports that Chorier’s strategy of running a controlled and steady race, persisting in the top 5 until opportunities became available later in the day paid solid dividends, with a move past Timothy Olsen in the final 20km allowing him to grab 2nd place behind legend & ultimate winner Ryan Sandes.

Hicks also reported after the event that there was shock as organisers called Sandes to say that he had been disqualified for failing to produce his space blanket at the finish line. However, they had asked for his ‘cover’, an expression which meant little to many of the competitors and he was reinstated shortly after once the confusion was cleared up, as he had indeed had his space blanket in his pack as required.

Julian Chorier (Hoka OneOne), Ryan Sandes (Salomon Running-Red Bull), Timothy Olson (The North Face)

For Meghan M Hicks round-up of the race, go here

For information about Hoka OneOne running shoes, local Australian running stockists, or to buy online, go here

Bogong2Hotham 2014, the Race Director’s Perspective

This Sunday, January 12th, will see the 28th running of Bogong2Hotham, also known as The Rooftop Run, in the literally breathtaking Victorian Alps. It is also the first year of the race being sponsored by Hoka OneOne Australia.
The fun begins from the foot of Mt. Bogong, a nastily steep mountain in the middle of some of Australia’s best running country. Between the 2km mark and the 8km mark on this 64km course, runners will climb over 1100 metres. And then they’ll still have 56km to go.
Race director Andy Hewat has overcome some serious challenges as an extreme ultrarunner. And he is not only one of Australia’s most respected ultramarathon race directors (or RDs), but he is also one of those handful of adventure-seeking guys & girls who fits the category If They Haven’t Done It, It’s Not Worth Doing.
Here’s a bit of insight into one of Australia’s longest running ultramarathons from the man himself.
And if you haven’t conditioned your quads already, be prepared to leave them out there.
Hoka: Bogong 2 Hotham is a race steeped in tradition. How long have you been RD, how did you come to the position, and what are some interesting historical facts runners might be surprised to learn about B2H?
Andy Hewat: I took over the organising of Bogong for the 2011 event. Which means I actually started in the role mid 2010. I was approached by AURA via then Secretary, Brett Saxon, (actually while I was at Hardrock) to see if I was interested. The race had been left in the lurch by the previous RD who had only just taken over from Mike Grayling who ran it for 10 years prior to that. It was a no-brainer, I had run it 6 times (for 3 finishes) and loved it and couldn’t stand the idea of it not going ahead. It was also an opportunity to return it to its traditional format and cement its place in trailrunning folklore.

Interesting fact? Only three runners have ever broken 7hrs. Stu Gibson ran 6:59 in 2011, Neil Hooper ran 6:58 in 1985, just the second year and Andy Kromar has done it a couple of times. In 1998 he ran 6:58 but in 1996 he set the current course record of 6:41:02. That means the record has stood for 17 years. That same year, Andy also set course records at Cradle and 6 Foot Track. Will we ever see the Bogong course record fall?

A very serious elevation profile.

As a runner, what do you see as the most challenging aspect of B2H, and what strategic advice would you give to first-timers who might not be sure how to best plan their first alpine adventure? Read more of this post

474 race kilometres in 4 very ultra weekends

Hi, this is Roger from Hoka in Australia. I’m taking on an extreme running challenge starting this weekend at Great Ocean Walk. It’s not going to be fast, it’s not going to be pretty, but it’s definitely going to get interesting.

Hoka OneOne 2014: Best in Show

The Hoka OneOne Conquest, due in 2014.

Outdoor Retailer in the US is the gear guru’s Lollapalooza, it’s Christmas for technical material heads, it’s the Big Day Out for mountaineers, adventurers and athletes, without the drifting piles of garbage and retro rock carried past drunk teenagers by strong summer winds.

Basically, Outdoor Retailer is the place to be if you’re into innovation, functional equipment, and want to know what’s going to blow up over the next 12 months.

Guess what? We told you so.

Hoka best in show

Mindblowing Endurance in Death Valley

Badwater is referred to with a degree of awe for good reason. Whether there may be counter-claims for the title of Toughest Endurance Event On Earth, there is no doubt that this 135-mile slog across Death Valley – a place so hot and dry that without water even highly conditioned endurance athletes face death within hours – holds the original claim to that honour.

Grant Maughan. Just not sure if this is the start line of the single Badwater, or the finish line of his double Badwater….

I am so happy to have just received this epic writeup from Grant Maughan, 2013 Australian competitor. It’s a long piece that really starts with a slow burn but ultimately takes root like wildfire. If you don’t know how it ends, it’s certainly not for me to spoil it for you. Just read it. I dare you to not be moved.

The grime of the road & the desert had peppered me with a thick grungy coating, my teeth felt like unfinished concrete. I could feel the stiffness in my clothing as I moved , caked as they were in salt & dirt. I felt very alive , though physiologically I was probably more like a corpse . To some it is a wonder that people would do this kind of thing to themselves but honestly, I have come to regard that feeling of total depletion & ragged fatigue as a maxim of my existence. I find it quietly satisfying, just like the free dive to the abyss , where you go to a place that your body is not really made to go , but then after your own efforts, return to the place that you really belong.

Grant’s blog is DingoFishExpress and I’ll definitely be ploughing through it further after reading this exceptional piece from the way-out-there. Thanks Grant!

Of course, if you’re too ADHD for a long-form read, Grant’s also kindly put together an 8-minute video. LOVE IT!

And now…. The New Bondi

That’s right. We figured that the boat is almost here so it’s okay to whip you all up into a frenzy of frothing shoe excitement. We’ve had a sample of the new improved Bondi on hand for a couple of months now and haven’t been able to say anything about it. But our patience, and yours, will be rewarded in just a couple of weeks.

We do love the Speeds, and there are more sky-blue and party-red Bondi arriving too, but we’re wondering, is this the best-looking Bondi yet? Anthracite, grey and yellow, soon to hit the shelves of your local running specialty shops – including the newly added Hoka retailers Running Edge in Hobart, The Runners Shop in Canberra, and The Running Company in Potts Point.

New for Australian runners, the Spring/Summer 2013 edition of the Bondi 2, breathable with a tougher upper, more padding behind the Achilles, and the same super-comfortable underfoot feel that defines every shoe from Hoka OneOne.

New for Australian runners, the Spring/Summer 2013 edition of the Bondi 2, breathable with a tougher upper, more padding behind the Achilles, and the same super-comfortable underfoot feel that defines every shoe from Hoka OneOne.

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