The Hoka OneOne Bondi – what makes this running shoe so different?

For Australian runners, the Bondi B/ Bondi Low/ Bondi Speed/ Bondi 2/ Bondi 3 in all its incarnations has been the shoe that grabbed so much attention when Hoka first came to Australia back in 2011, the shoe that most users of Hoka OneOne running gear will have at least one pair of, and that probably offers the clearest first experience to new wearers of what Hoka OneOne means.

See the grey ones in the middle – that was my first pair of Bondi Bs! It kind of gets me emotional, and then I just feel grateful for the new colour schemes 🙂 Click on the picture for my first ever writeup of the Bondi B as well.

The Hoka OneOne Bondi puts 24.5mm of superlight cushioning under the forefoot, 29mm under the heel, and in the latest model – the Bondi 3 – it weighs in at 315g in a US8.5 men’s model and 267g in a US6.5W women’s model. You couldn’t possibly fit that much marshmallow under someone’s foot without tripling the weight of the shoe, but running on marshmallows is one of the most typical ways we hear new Hoka runners describe the feeling of the Bondi. Running on clouds, running on a trampoline, running on pillows – these are also common ways for runners to describe their first experience of the Bondi.

Fast forward 3 years, and the Bondi is a very advanced new animal with the same classic midsole and a number of champion endurance athletes singing its praises. #toldyouso

When you strap the Bondi to tired legs, or when you’re deep into a half-marathon or full marathon with less fatigue than you might be used to, suddenly the shoes weigh next to nothing and those clouds you’re running on feel like they’re racing toward the horizon. That, of course, is subjective. Read more of this post

Hoka’s cutting edge technology

There might be a lot of shoes that deserve to be cut in half by runners, but surely not Hoka! Nevertheless, here’s a great dissection of the shoe (yeah, that was a pun) by a Hoka OneOne fan.

1. Crazy outside but sane inside: As you can see in second photo in this post, the outsides of the shoe have a lot of visible foam. I think it stabilizes the wide sole, cups the heel and almost cradles the rest of the foot aside from simply giving Hoka One One shoes a very distinctive and recognizable look.  After slicing the shoe in half I realized that’s part of the secret: the shoe is a big party on the outside promising a different experience – and it is different ride: it is a wide shoe, it’s taller (although some of the height appearance may be a trick on the eyes because of the tall foam on the outside) and the cushioning is pretty luxurious, especially at the beginning. But looking at the cross-section it’s a lot more basic and definitely more akin to what you’d envision a “normal” running shoe to look like to the point of the above photo almost looking like it is another shoe. And for me, this combination of crazy but sane really works.

continue reading here…

What a great idea! Reminds me of something we did a little while ago….  🙂

The running evolution that is taking over…

When a particularly large, superlight, and strange looking shoe appeared a few years ago, some thought it was science, others sorcery, but most just plain silly. The shoe outperformed the expectations of most and stale indignation turned slowly to intrigue.

Current models, a comparison

Current models, a comparison

Now, many runners have at least one friend pounding out the miles on trail or road in a pair of Hoka OneOne and even if they don’t, judging from Outdoor Retailer’s latest Gearapallooza, next year they’ll probably know someone running in a Hoka CloneClone.

Hoka One One is a real game changer – which is why so many other brands – even those touting minimal shoes very recently – are now introducing Hoka inspired shoes.   However, it seems as if they are strictly copying the oversize nature of some of the most popular Hoka models – which is only one aspect of the design.  Simply being oversized will not provide the same benefit as Hoka One One shoes.  There is more to the technology than just that.

That’s Jim Van Dine, Hoka’s global Brand President talking to RunBlogRun in a fresh new interview we thought you’d find interesting.

Read more here…

Hoka OneOne Conquest 2014

Hoka OneOne 2014: Best in Show

The Hoka OneOne Conquest, due in 2014.

Outdoor Retailer in the US is the gear guru’s Lollapalooza, it’s Christmas for technical material heads, it’s the Big Day Out for mountaineers, adventurers and athletes, without the drifting piles of garbage and retro rock carried past drunk teenagers by strong summer winds.

Basically, Outdoor Retailer is the place to be if you’re into innovation, functional equipment, and want to know what’s going to blow up over the next 12 months.

Guess what? We told you so.

Hoka best in show

2013 Hoka OneOne running top now available online

That’s right! Now available online to Australia for $35 including delivery, men’s in black on white, women’s in pink on white. These super-breathable technical running singlets from our friends at Get Shirty wick sweat away and feel comfortable for running all day long. Check out the apparel section at http://shop.hokaoneone.com.au/clothing/ and simply ask for the new men’s or women’s top in the comments section.

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Hoka OneOne – the evolution continues

Hoka OneOne in 2013 is very much the same as Hoka OneOne in 2010 – an innovative and super comfortable running shoe.

But, clearly, a couple of things have changed. No longer is Hoka OneOne a brand with one, big, bright yellow Hulk foot of a shoe that is visible from outer space. In fact, the latest shoes from Hoka – the Rapa Nui and the Kailua – look almost normal. But they’re not – not entirely.

One of the most common questions we get at running and triathlon expos that we go to and demo runs that we put on from time to time is, ‘what’s the difference between the models?’. It’s not the most exciting sounding question, it’s definitely not as intriguing as, ‘what makes these different?’ (I mean, have you seen our shoes?) but it is a great question to answer. Answering the simple question, ‘what’s the difference between the models?’ is probably the easiest way to explain the evolution of Hoka OneOne, and therefore to understand just where the new Rapa Nui and Kailua fit in.

Current models, a comparison

Current models, a comparison

So here, briefly, is the evolution of the Hoka range. Read more of this post

New Hoka OneOne Kailua & Rapa Nui

Jane Trumper is an athlete ambassador for Hoka OneOne Australia for a few good reasons. First woman to complete the Australian Grand Slam of Ultra, first woman to run from the centre of Australia across the Simpson Desert, with over 100 road marathons done in the last 10 years, and she was already running happily in her Bondi Bs when we first approached her about representing Hoka. And she calls a spade a spade. Jane has had more chance than most to run in the new lower profile Kailua Trail and Kailua Tarmac from Hoka. What did she think of them?

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