The Hoka OneOne Bondi – what makes this running shoe so different?

For Australian runners, the Bondi B/ Bondi Low/ Bondi Speed/ Bondi 2/ Bondi 3 in all its incarnations has been the shoe that grabbed so much attention when Hoka first came to Australia back in 2011, the shoe that most users of Hoka OneOne running gear will have at least one pair of, and that probably offers the clearest first experience to new wearers of what Hoka OneOne means.

See the grey ones in the middle – that was my first pair of Bondi Bs! It kind of gets me emotional, and then I just feel grateful for the new colour schemes 🙂 Click on the picture for my first ever writeup of the Bondi B as well.

The Hoka OneOne Bondi puts 24.5mm of superlight cushioning under the forefoot, 29mm under the heel, and in the latest model – the Bondi 3 – it weighs in at 315g in a US8.5 men’s model and 267g in a US6.5W women’s model. You couldn’t possibly fit that much marshmallow under someone’s foot without tripling the weight of the shoe, but running on marshmallows is one of the most typical ways we hear new Hoka runners describe the feeling of the Bondi. Running on clouds, running on a trampoline, running on pillows – these are also common ways for runners to describe their first experience of the Bondi.

Fast forward 3 years, and the Bondi is a very advanced new animal with the same classic midsole and a number of champion endurance athletes singing its praises. #toldyouso

When you strap the Bondi to tired legs, or when you’re deep into a half-marathon or full marathon with less fatigue than you might be used to, suddenly the shoes weigh next to nothing and those clouds you’re running on feel like they’re racing toward the horizon. That, of course, is subjective. Read more of this post

What is the difference between the Hoka models?

One of the most common things we get asked when we’re at triathlon, health & fitness, and running expo’s or signing up new stores is this very question: What is the difference between the Hoka models?

Make sure to press the ‘Follow Hoka OneOne’ button to get simple and easy articles and updates to your inbox —->

Over the next couple of weeks, we’ll be answering this for you here at http://www.hokaoneoneaustralia.com by posting an individual overview of each model:

Kailua Trail

As well as talking about each model in individual detail, we’ll make some simple but useful comparisons by pointing out things like the benefits of the Bondi 3 to the runner with a higher volume foot relative to the Stinson Tarmac which deliberately fits more closely for a responsive feel, or how someone who wants the cushioning of a Hoka but feels they collapse a bit in the Kailua will find that the Conquest, while still a neutral shoe, offers a previously unknown level of control and guidance in a Hoka.

Simply click the little rectangle on the right hand side of your screen that says ‘Follow Hoka OneOne’ to get these articles and update notifications emailed to you as they’re posted over the coming weeks.

Stinson Trail

Hoka’s Julien Chorier podiums The North Face TransGranCanaria

Hoka OneOne’s recent 100-mile athlete addition is the European supremo, Julien Chorier. He has also recently picked up sponsorship from Compressport (copying Scott Hawker there maybe – nice one Scotty!). In the lead-up to the weekend’s epic ultra and 2nd event in the Ultra-Trail World Tour series for the year, Julien and a couple of his European Hoka teammates ran around the island demonstrating some of the upcoming new Hoka kit for 2014. Careful, some of these photos may get you over-excited, especially if you already have more than 4 pairs of Hoka OneOne in your current running rotation.

Endurance running champion Julien Chorier, in his high performance mystery Hoka OneOne, set for release July 2014

But of course, more important than the pre-event running around with photographers and trail journos was the team’s running across the island – 125km and 8,500+m elev. gain – for TransGranCanaria itself. Meghan M Hicks from iRunFar.com reports that Chorier’s strategy of running a controlled and steady race, persisting in the top 5 until opportunities became available later in the day paid solid dividends, with a move past Timothy Olsen in the final 20km allowing him to grab 2nd place behind legend & ultimate winner Ryan Sandes.

Hicks also reported after the event that there was shock as organisers called Sandes to say that he had been disqualified for failing to produce his space blanket at the finish line. However, they had asked for his ‘cover’, an expression which meant little to many of the competitors and he was reinstated shortly after once the confusion was cleared up, as he had indeed had his space blanket in his pack as required.

Julian Chorier (Hoka OneOne), Ryan Sandes (Salomon Running-Red Bull), Timothy Olson (The North Face)

For Meghan M Hicks round-up of the race, go here

For information about Hoka OneOne running shoes, local Australian running stockists, or to buy online, go here

Running For Stroke – Dan Englund in Runner’s World

Was at the newsagent checking out the review of the Conquest in the latest issue of Outside Magazine when I spotted this one in Runner’s World. Dan Englund’s a longtime Hoka user with a big brave back story, and having fought his way back from stroke at a surprisingly young age he’s now clocking up huge mileage and big dollars fundraising for the cause closest to his heart.

Dan Englund profiled for his courage and fundraising work in the February issue of Runners World Australia.

Dan Englund profiled for his courage and fundraising work in the February issue of Runners World Australia.

Malcolm Law’s Mountainous New Zealand Challenge: 50 Marathons in 50 Days

ew Zealand’s Malcolm Law is a master when it comes to running on the ragged edge. We’re big fans 🙂

Here’s an article from the latest issue of UltraFit magazine outlining a challenge and an opportunity. Malcolm is doing something amazing and daunting in 2015. If you’ve ever wanted to run trails in New Zealand, you might never have a better chance to do something equal parts spectacular and meaningful.

UltraFit Malcolm Law Story Jan-Feb 2014 100 png

Scott Hawker, chilling in Beijing

Flashing his shorts at -3, Hoka OneOne Australia's Scott Hawker out for a training run in Beijing, on his way to the Hong Kong 100 later this month.

Flashing his shorts at -3, Hoka OneOne Australia’s Scott Hawker out for a training run in Beijing, on his way to the Hong Kong 100 later this month.

Just heard from Team Hoka’s Scotty Hawker, freshly back from turning his legs over in Beijing as he gets ready for the Hong Kong 100 later this month.

A little colder here (-3deg) than Australia!! Heading out for a run around the Forbidden City in Beijing.

Got so many smiles and laughs from locals cause I was wearing shorts. Guess that’s the kiwi in me.

Along with The North Face 100 here in Australia in May, Tarawera in New Zealand in March, and a swag of other spectacular ultra marathons throughout the year and around the globe, the HK100 is now part of the Ultra Trail World Tour and as such will see a fast lineup of internationals racing alongside Scott, including Dave Mackey, Claire Price, and Jez Bragg.

Good luck Scott! Great chance to mix it up with some of the best.

 

Bogong2Hotham 2014, the Race Director’s Perspective

This Sunday, January 12th, will see the 28th running of Bogong2Hotham, also known as The Rooftop Run, in the literally breathtaking Victorian Alps. It is also the first year of the race being sponsored by Hoka OneOne Australia.
The fun begins from the foot of Mt. Bogong, a nastily steep mountain in the middle of some of Australia’s best running country. Between the 2km mark and the 8km mark on this 64km course, runners will climb over 1100 metres. And then they’ll still have 56km to go.
Race director Andy Hewat has overcome some serious challenges as an extreme ultrarunner. And he is not only one of Australia’s most respected ultramarathon race directors (or RDs), but he is also one of those handful of adventure-seeking guys & girls who fits the category If They Haven’t Done It, It’s Not Worth Doing.
Here’s a bit of insight into one of Australia’s longest running ultramarathons from the man himself.
And if you haven’t conditioned your quads already, be prepared to leave them out there.
Hoka: Bogong 2 Hotham is a race steeped in tradition. How long have you been RD, how did you come to the position, and what are some interesting historical facts runners might be surprised to learn about B2H?
Andy Hewat: I took over the organising of Bogong for the 2011 event. Which means I actually started in the role mid 2010. I was approached by AURA via then Secretary, Brett Saxon, (actually while I was at Hardrock) to see if I was interested. The race had been left in the lurch by the previous RD who had only just taken over from Mike Grayling who ran it for 10 years prior to that. It was a no-brainer, I had run it 6 times (for 3 finishes) and loved it and couldn’t stand the idea of it not going ahead. It was also an opportunity to return it to its traditional format and cement its place in trailrunning folklore.

Interesting fact? Only three runners have ever broken 7hrs. Stu Gibson ran 6:59 in 2011, Neil Hooper ran 6:58 in 1985, just the second year and Andy Kromar has done it a couple of times. In 1998 he ran 6:58 but in 1996 he set the current course record of 6:41:02. That means the record has stood for 17 years. That same year, Andy also set course records at Cradle and 6 Foot Track. Will we ever see the Bogong course record fall?

A very serious elevation profile.

As a runner, what do you see as the most challenging aspect of B2H, and what strategic advice would you give to first-timers who might not be sure how to best plan their first alpine adventure? Read more of this post
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