How much do you really love your Hoka OneOne?

Some friends just sent us this pic in answer to the above question. It’s their way of saying ‘a lot’!

Thanks Shane & Belinda! I think you've covered pretty much every model.

Thanks Shane & Belinda! I think you’ve covered pretty much every model.

They even got the font right. 🙂

Scott Hawker, chilling in Beijing

Flashing his shorts at -3, Hoka OneOne Australia's Scott Hawker out for a training run in Beijing, on his way to the Hong Kong 100 later this month.

Flashing his shorts at -3, Hoka OneOne Australia’s Scott Hawker out for a training run in Beijing, on his way to the Hong Kong 100 later this month.

Just heard from Team Hoka’s Scotty Hawker, freshly back from turning his legs over in Beijing as he gets ready for the Hong Kong 100 later this month.

A little colder here (-3deg) than Australia!! Heading out for a run around the Forbidden City in Beijing.

Got so many smiles and laughs from locals cause I was wearing shorts. Guess that’s the kiwi in me.

Along with The North Face 100 here in Australia in May, Tarawera in New Zealand in March, and a swag of other spectacular ultra marathons throughout the year and around the globe, the HK100 is now part of the Ultra Trail World Tour and as such will see a fast lineup of internationals racing alongside Scott, including Dave Mackey, Claire Price, and Jez Bragg.

Good luck Scott! Great chance to mix it up with some of the best.

 

Bogong2Hotham 2014, the Race Director’s Perspective

This Sunday, January 12th, will see the 28th running of Bogong2Hotham, also known as The Rooftop Run, in the literally breathtaking Victorian Alps. It is also the first year of the race being sponsored by Hoka OneOne Australia.
The fun begins from the foot of Mt. Bogong, a nastily steep mountain in the middle of some of Australia’s best running country. Between the 2km mark and the 8km mark on this 64km course, runners will climb over 1100 metres. And then they’ll still have 56km to go.
Race director Andy Hewat has overcome some serious challenges as an extreme ultrarunner. And he is not only one of Australia’s most respected ultramarathon race directors (or RDs), but he is also one of those handful of adventure-seeking guys & girls who fits the category If They Haven’t Done It, It’s Not Worth Doing.
Here’s a bit of insight into one of Australia’s longest running ultramarathons from the man himself.
And if you haven’t conditioned your quads already, be prepared to leave them out there.
Hoka: Bogong 2 Hotham is a race steeped in tradition. How long have you been RD, how did you come to the position, and what are some interesting historical facts runners might be surprised to learn about B2H?
Andy Hewat: I took over the organising of Bogong for the 2011 event. Which means I actually started in the role mid 2010. I was approached by AURA via then Secretary, Brett Saxon, (actually while I was at Hardrock) to see if I was interested. The race had been left in the lurch by the previous RD who had only just taken over from Mike Grayling who ran it for 10 years prior to that. It was a no-brainer, I had run it 6 times (for 3 finishes) and loved it and couldn’t stand the idea of it not going ahead. It was also an opportunity to return it to its traditional format and cement its place in trailrunning folklore.

Interesting fact? Only three runners have ever broken 7hrs. Stu Gibson ran 6:59 in 2011, Neil Hooper ran 6:58 in 1985, just the second year and Andy Kromar has done it a couple of times. In 1998 he ran 6:58 but in 1996 he set the current course record of 6:41:02. That means the record has stood for 17 years. That same year, Andy also set course records at Cradle and 6 Foot Track. Will we ever see the Bogong course record fall?

A very serious elevation profile.

As a runner, what do you see as the most challenging aspect of B2H, and what strategic advice would you give to first-timers who might not be sure how to best plan their first alpine adventure? Read more of this post

Great North Walk 100-miler Race Report: It begins…

Hi, Roger again. I’ve put the race report from the 100-miler that beasted me on the weekend on my blog http://www.runeatsleeprun.com. It was an incredible way to finish this month of ultrarunning adventure but hardly an outing in high-paced glory. Rather, it was a total sufferfest. As much as it became a battle for survival, more or less, it is still one of the most meaningful finishes I have ever achieved. My crewman Graham and pacer Jess were exceptional and I certainly put their patience to the test. Let’s face it, we all expected a Sunday lunch on the beach and instead found ourselves literally racing against the clock right to the 160th kilometre.

It wasn’t necessarily what it was hoped to be, but it was raw, it was heartfelt, it was do or die, and at the end of the day, if an event is all of those things and more, what more could you possibly ask?

To read more, just follow this link.

Beautiful Running in Italy, and Rapa Nui Trails

Loving this video, shot from a drone and posted to the Hoka OneOne Australia Facebook by an Italian-based fan, Enrico Bocci.

It’s not just the terrain that’s different to Australian forest in this clip. Enjoy!

(and buy some Rapa Nui Trail from our shop or your local running specialist when you’re done)

Still 100km to get to halfway: Octember pt. 1 The Great Ocean Walk 100

Between October 12 and November 10, I have set myself the challenge of running 3 100km races and a 174km trailrunning slaughterhouse on one of Australia’s toughest 100-mile courses. It’s a total of 474 race kilometres within 30 days and even with 200 kilometres already down, I don’t feel any closer to the halfway mark. Maybe after this Sunday’s Ned Kelly Chase in Wangaratta (northern Victoria), when only the Great North Walk miler remains, I’ll feel like only the hardest part of Octember remains. But halfway isn’t the finish, and as every ultrarunner knows, it isn’t even halfway.

GOW map view

The Great Ocean Walk (shuffle, sprint, stagger, roll, run, shuffle, dawdle, heave, bolt)

IMG_2608

RD Andy Hewat explains the GOW100’s complicated navigation protocol…

The first of the month’s 4 runs, the Great Ocean Walk 100, was on one of the most beautiful and unforgiving routes in Australia. With the simple instruction to keep the ocean on our left, close to a hundred runners raced, staggered, stumbled and deliriously zigzagged their way from Apollo Bay to the iconic Twelve Apostles. Perhaps if I’d been less preoccupied with thoughts of the long month ahead or had even just brought my climbing legs with me, I’d have run into sight of these monolithic oceanic landmarks before the sun had dropped from view for the day. Getting in just under 15 hours on a course that I’d expected to be a lot kinder was a good bucket of cold water to the face. Just as recently minted US Grand Slammer Andre Blumberg had advised me, confirming lessons from last year’s 4 Deserts Grand Slam, 4 out of 4 is a long game and it’s different than the one everyone else is playing. This challenge was going to be a challenge! Read more of this post

474 race kilometres in 4 very ultra weekends

Hi, this is Roger from Hoka in Australia. I’m taking on an extreme running challenge starting this weekend at Great Ocean Walk. It’s not going to be fast, it’s not going to be pretty, but it’s definitely going to get interesting.

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